Writer: Kyle Pearson

Technology advancing is seemingly the biggest strength of humans and has allowed amazing growth for our world but it may be hindering us in ways we are not aware.

Walking around a college campus one cannot help but notice that nearly everyone has headphones on. Students everywhere retreat into their own worlds of music, podcasts, and even audio books. Even without headphones, there is typically a screen in front of someone when walking from point A to point B.

What would have been a walk loaded with countless interactions with strangers is now a simple bee line to a destination with little to no interference.

Interactions with strangers on a day to day basis take people, especially students, out of their comfort zone. This feeling of discomfort becomes less foreign after one gains the experience of how to successfully interact with a stranger, seemingly becoming comfortable with the discomfort.

These encounters and interactions teach important communication and behavioral skills that are learned best through experience. With the advancement of technology allowing most people to disassociate from their surroundings, this experience is becoming harder to obtain.

One may argue that this withdraw from your surroundings can be beneficial and with that I agree. Being able to escape from your surroundings and into your own world of entertainment is a beautiful thing that is underappreciated by our society, however one must consider if they spend more time listening to their headphones than they do the actual world around them.

Building communication skills early on in life can be essential to one’s success in the professional world. By allowing yourself to be in the moment and be interactive with the people around you, one will obtain knowledge of how people think and operate differently. These communication skills gained by interaction and experience can only benefit you on your journey through life. I challenge readers to take a week and unplug and see if you can notice the difference that comes from living in the now.


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